UP!–The 2015 PRINCETON BOOK FESTIVAL!

PROGRAM headerI honestly don’t think I can adequately express just how beside myself I was when I first got a gander at the stellar line-up of KidLit “stars” who’d be attending the Princeton Book Festival this year. Seriously—Cloud 9 became my footstool. In fact, it still feels a bit cushiony under my feet 😀 Continue reading

UP!–Robert McCloskey: Living Legend

Portrait from Cincinnati dot com

It’s hard to believe it’s been 1 1/2 years since I first drafted this post. It was almost a year before I actually launched my blogs! Now that there’s a break between posts involving ReRead-alongs, events I’ve attended and KidLit-related occasions to acknowledge, I can finally share with you this little celebration of a truly great talent:

In wanting to know a bit more about illustrators whose work I admire, I discovered to what extent author/illustrator Robert McCloskey’s work touched the world.          

As a renowned author and illustrator, Robert McCloskey has influenced many in the field of children’s literature. Born on September 14, 1914, Robert’s childhood was spent in post-World War I America, in Hamilton, Ohio, with his parents and two younger sisters. His interests were of a creative nature, developing at an early age. Along with art, he enjoyed music, having learned to play the harmonica. He also had a penchant for inventing mechanical devices, which led his parents to encourage him to pursue a career in auto mechanics, believing art was not a viable way to earn a living. However, art won out. Continue reading

UP!–It’s NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK, sooo…

NYPL Lion & The Cat in the Hat with TEXT for blog post

For the few of you who were privy to this blog before I officially launched in Sept. 2014, this image of the NYPL Lion with The Cat in the Hat may look familiar to you. I had it filling space at that time, simply to have an image on the page and stated I would eventually post the article I wrote for which I’d done this artwork. I realize you’ve been waiting with bated breath having suffered sleepless nights with the anticipation having been so overwhelming 😉 Well, your Patience (yes, we’ll consider this lion Patience rather than Fortitude) has been greatly appreciated and hopefully worth the wait.

This was originally written for our NJ SCBWI magazine Sprouts (no longer printed) way back in January 2010, though it had been heavily trimmed due to page space constraints. I chose to post it now, in its full version, in honor of National Library Week, April 12–18 🙂 Keep in mind that some things that were stated 5 years ago are no longer current in respect to the state of the market/industry, etc. I’d like to point out that at that time, the monthly events were known as the Children’s Literary Cafe, now known as the Children’s Literary Salon. Also, since that time I’ve had the privilege to meet Betsy (Elizabeth) Byrd at the recent Bank Street Book Store Grand Re-opening enabling me to give her a copy of this article including the artwork 😀 .

As you read, it will be obvious how much I enjoyed this event. If you are ever able to attend, you can search for upcoming events on their site. I highly recommend it! So here we gooooo… Continue reading

UP! — BANK STREET BOOK STORE Bonanza!

Bank Street Storefront with red carpet copyFor a children’s book lover like me, attending a big KidLit event is akin to a giddy movie fan attending an after party for the Academy Awards. Granted—it’s been a long time since I’ve cared to watch an award show, but that’s not the point. In my opinion this far exceeds any of that brouhaha, and I can tell you—I’ll eat my bookmark if I didn’t see a red carpet on the sidewalk in front of the Bank Street Book Store for its Grand Re-Opening celebration on March 7th!

Murderers Row

 

Never mind that this was in Manhattan, much like the Bronx Bombers’ “Murderers’ Row,” the line up of 31 guest authors and illustrators was filled with KidLit “home run” hitters. We’re talkin’ Newbery and Caldecott, people! No, I kid you not! Continue reading

UP!–Randolph Caldecott: The Man Behind the Medal

Ralph Caldecott-portraitBorn in Chester, England on March 22, 1846, Randolph Caldecott, the British artist and illustrator, made an indelible mark in the world of children’s book publishing during his short life, having died just shy of his 40th birthday on February 12, 1886. This is why, in 1937, at the suggestion of Frederic G. Melcher, the American Library Association established The Randolph Caldecott Medal

I’m sure that if I had properly attended art school and focused on illustration, I would’ve long ago known more about Randolph Caldecott. During my research, I discovered his artistic skills and innovation to be remarkable, especially considering the time period in which his picture books were printed. The ideal pairing of Caldecott as an illustrator, and Edmund Evans as engraver and printer, resulted in high-quality books that were—and still are—more than impressive. Caldecott’s work was so outstanding at that time, it is said that Beatrix Potter’s father purchased Caldecott originals to inspire his daughter. Continue reading