UP!–Q&A with Peter H. Reynolds

Q&A-LighterSideUp_WriterSideUp.com_byDonnaMariePeter - portrait

     A “Lighter Side Up”

            Q & A with

        Peter Reynolds

 

Confident that someone wouldn’t have to be unusually perceptive, it’s not a stretch to assume you’ve gotten just a bit of a hint that I am somewhat OVER-THE-MOON, JUMPING-OUT-OF-MY-SKIN EXCITED about the Reynolds brothers visiting my blogs for a “chat” in celebration of International Dot Day 😁😍👍👏😎❣💥!!!!!!!

No “Dynamic Duo” is complete when you have one of a pair. Last week I had the pleasure of one cape-donning superhero dropping by: the amazing Paul Reynolds. This week none other than the pencil-and-brush-wielding Peter Reynolds is here. Needless to say, very much in “Lois Lane” fashion, I’ve been swept off my feet to circle the stars by their gracious presence and certainly their incredibly thoughtful, moving and inspirational responses to my questions. I’m betting you enjoyed Paul’s and are about to enjoy Peter’s too 😀 😎 (also posted on “Creativity” Cookbook) Continue reading

UP!–Q&A with Paul A. Reynolds

Q&A-LighterSideUp_WriterSideUp.com_byDonnaMariePaul - portrait

       A “Lighter Side Up”

               Q & A with

            Paul Reynolds

 

For those of you who’ve been following my blog since its launch, you may recall that at that time it had been planned to do Q&As with the Reynolds brothers, but due to life’s demands the posts had to be postponed. These are two busy guys. After all, what else would you expect from superheroes?! Well, I can tell you—they were worth the wait. When you read their sensitive, wise, affecting responses to my questions, their superpowers are crystal clear: words and actions that stem from passionate, sincere hearts. I’m SO honored to be hosting them as part of International Dot Day 2018 (just 2 weeks away, having been inspired by Peter’s book, The Dot!). This year, rather than creating my own little Dot, I think this is a MUCH better way to celebrate 🙂 ❤ Continue reading

UP!–Robert McCloskey: Living Legend

Portrait from Cincinnati dot com

It’s hard to believe it’s been 1 1/2 years since I first drafted this post. It was almost a year before I actually launched my blogs! Now that there’s a break between posts involving ReRead-alongs, events I’ve attended and KidLit-related occasions to acknowledge, I can finally share with you this little celebration of a truly great talent:

In wanting to know a bit more about illustrators whose work I admire, I discovered to what extent author/illustrator Robert McCloskey’s work touched the world.          

As a renowned author and illustrator, Robert McCloskey has influenced many in the field of children’s literature. Born on September 14, 1914, Robert’s childhood was spent in post-World War I America, in Hamilton, Ohio, with his parents and two younger sisters. His interests were of a creative nature, developing at an early age. Along with art, he enjoyed music, having learned to play the harmonica. He also had a penchant for inventing mechanical devices, which led his parents to encourage him to pursue a career in auto mechanics, believing art was not a viable way to earn a living. However, art won out. Continue reading

UP!–Celebrating the Format of PRINT PICTURE BOOKS!

Picture Book Month-Celebration LogoIn case you weren’t aware—IT’S PICTURE BOOK MONTH! I’ve been heavily involved in the Kidlit World of Picture Books for decades now, but hadn’t known of this more-than-worthwhile celebration ’til last year when I got more immersed in Twitter and social media. And OH, what a celebration it is! Continue reading

UP!–Randolph Caldecott: The Man Behind the Medal

Ralph Caldecott-portraitBorn in Chester, England on March 22, 1846, Randolph Caldecott, the British artist and illustrator, made an indelible mark in the world of children’s book publishing during his short life, having died just shy of his 40th birthday on February 12, 1886. This is why, in 1937, at the suggestion of Frederic G. Melcher, the American Library Association established The Randolph Caldecott Medal

I’m sure that if I had properly attended art school and focused on illustration, I would’ve long ago known more about Randolph Caldecott. During my research, I discovered his artistic skills and innovation to be remarkable, especially considering the time period in which his picture books were printed. The ideal pairing of Caldecott as an illustrator, and Edmund Evans as engraver and printer, resulted in high-quality books that were—and still are—more than impressive. Caldecott’s work was so outstanding at that time, it is said that Beatrix Potter’s father purchased Caldecott originals to inspire his daughter. Continue reading