UP!–What’s Worth Celebrating?–CHILDREN’S BOOK WEEK!

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It seems to me there are days, weeks and even years of celebration for just about anything anyone can think of, and I can’t say I see the point of many of them, but anyone who knows me knows I agree that children’s books are definitely something to celebrate. Now, did you know (I didn’t!) that this week, May 4-10, the 2015 Children’s Book Week marks its 96th year? How wonderful! And is this poster by Grace Lee precious or what? It gives me the “warm fuzzies” every time I see it 😀 You can get this poster and more through their site, and if you’re a nostalgic soul and like collectibles, the Official Children’s Book Week Store has lots of goodies from the past 96 years. Considering some of the most talented people are part of the children’s book industry, you can bet they’ve got some great stuff!

Are You My Mother? by I know my love for children’s books began when one would expect—when I was a child 🙂 There are a handful of books that stand out the most for me. I’m not sure why, but I was in love with Are You My Mother? by P. D. Eastman. I read it repeatedly! I’m thinking it was the silliness of a bird thinking an excavator was its mother, or maybe because that bird was just so darn cute.

What Pet Should I Get?As it was for most people, I was—and still am—in love with pretty much anything by Dr. Seuss. In my opinion, the man was a creative genius, and what’s so remarkable is that his books still hold the same appeal for adults. Well, this adult, at least! What’s wonderful, too, is that Random House is publishing previously unreleased works, new to all of us!!! On July 18, 2015 What Pet Should I Get? will hit the shelves 😀

 

Green Eggs and HamMcElligot's PoolMarvin K. Mooney Will You Please Go Now!

There was something about Ludwig Bemelmans‘ Madeline that was magical for me, too. Firstly, I suppose I could relate simply because I attended Catholic School as a child and Miss Clavel resembles a nun. But I think it was more than that. I think it was Madeline herself—she was quite her own person, the smallest, but bravest—and full of mischief 😉

 

One character I couldn’t resist, along with her adventures, was the quirky, lovable Pippi Longstocking. All these books, along with the treasured classic Charlotte’s Web (for which I wrote a guest post on Book Journey), hold a special place in my book-loving heart. Yes, children’s books are worth celebrating—again and      again and again…

 

Which children’s books do you hold dear? Do you have a special memory attached to a children’s book? I’d love to hear about them 🙂

 

 

57 thoughts on “UP!–What’s Worth Celebrating?–CHILDREN’S BOOK WEEK!

  1. Happy Children’s Book Week, Donna! Thrilled to read a new Dr. Seuss book. In terms of special childhood memory, I would say Madeline is up there, as are the Nutshell Series by Sendak, and Babar.

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  2. I love the poster. It gives me warm fuzzies too. It’s exactly what kids reading books is all about! I don’t remember Dr Seuss from my childhood, but have certainly enjoyed reading them to children in my older ‘childhood’!. Pippi Longstocking, Charlotte’s Web and Madeleine I also found as an adult. I’m not sure that I had many picture books as a young child, though my parents definitely encouraged reading and books were always given as gifts and visits to the library were regular. So I’m not sure why I don’t recall picture books. I did receive an illustrated “Heidi” when I was about 9 which I loved, and an “Alice in Wonderland” when I was ten, which I didn’t. My love of children’s books has flourished during adulthood. 🙂

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    • Oh, we appreciate them on a different level as an adult, and I’ll tell you, reading THE WIZARD OF OZ as an adult, for the first time, I absolutely couldn’t stand it lol It seems that some books are meant to be read when you’re a child. Others are timeless, I think, right? I wonder if there was less availability of American imprints in Australia. I’m glad you’re discovering so many now! 😀

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  3. Happy Children’s Book Week. Yes, love that poster. Great books you have listed. I didn’t read Madeline until my daughter came around but count it as a favorite now. One of the first books I remember is “The Fly Went By” and the first big book I remember reading and realizing that books can be fun (yeah, I wasn’t a big reader when I was little).. was Mr. Popper’s Penguins. Have a super day, friend!
    ~Christine for The Gang

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    • Hey, Christine 🙂 Actually, I only became aware of MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS recently. It may have coincided with the movie release. Haven’t read it yet, though. And I know A FLY WENT BY, but I don’t think I read it as a kid. May have!

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  4. Happy Children’s Book Week to You! Dr. Seuss was definitely a favorite of mine, too. I remember loving Where the Wild Things Are — that was one of the few picture books that we owned. Madeline was another one that I really enjoyed, and Tikki Tikki Tembo was also a favorite.

    As an adult, Iggy Peck, Architect and A Sick Day for Amos McGee began my love of picture books. It has just snowballed from there and I no longer just have a few favorite picture books — I think I’m into the high hundreds at this point. Oh there are so many wonderful ones!

    I didn’t realize it was Children’s Book Week — thank you for letting me know! 🙂 I hope you have a wonderful one!

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    • Tiffa, you are SO right, and I, too, love A SICK DAY FOR AMOS MCGEE. Fantastic book worthy of the Caldecott, for sure 😀 It’s very difficult for me to pick favorites, in general, because there are so many wonderful books. That’s one reason I don’t like awards, in and of themselves. The list is SO long! And I’m so glad you rediscovered picture books! I mean, look at you! Your blog IS picture books! lol

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  5. Happy Children’s Book Week, Donna! I ordered my poster and am letting the library borrow it for the week. 😉 Grace Lee’s artwork is amazing! When my second grade teacher read WHERE THE RED FERN GROWS to the class, I was mesmerized. Every book has its merits and its too difficult to pick favorites. 😀

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    • OOoooooo, WHERE THE RED FERN GROWS! LOVE that book so much. That one came to me as an adult. I was class mother for my son’s 4th grade class (MANY moons ago) and his teacher knew I was writing for kids. She lent me that one and THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE. She was wonderful teacher, one of son’s favorites (and she was the strictest 😀 ). I think of her whenever I think of those books 🙂

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    • Lizanne, thank you so much for the reblog 🙂 So complimentary! I just checked out your list and there are many there I haven’t read/heard of. I read THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS when I was a kid and barely remember the story (as is with many from back then :/ ). And ANNE OF GREEN GABLES is one of my favorites, though didn’t read it ’til a few years back. I just love that whole story. Have you ever seen the PBS movie with Megan Follows? LOVE it!

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        • Lizanne, Megan Follows is brilliant as Anne, and so many of the other characters—just fantastic. I really don’t think you’d be disappointed. In fact, I saw the movies before reading the first book 🙂

          And, you know, it’s been quite an eye-opener for me, finally reading so many children’s books as an adult. Some I loved as a child I’m finding myself wondering why, and then the ones that I appreciate SO much more as an adult, able to understand/see so much more. I don’t know about you, but I just love everything about Kidlit 😀

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            • lol…I’ve yet to become an “adult” book fan. I’ve read them on occasion and enjoyed what I read, but I generally prefer spending reading time in the kidlit world 🙂 I’m not into the whole graphic sex/violence/super-adult angst type stuff. What adult books (that aren’t graphic) are you enjoying? And I love that you were a school librarian, I’m assuming? 😀

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              • I was a teacher of kids 8-12 but I also ran the school library.
                I like quirky adult books like The Eyre Affair about an alternative England with an gateway into the pages of classic books written by Jasper Fforde. Alexander McCall Smith’s Scotland Street books about the residents of an apartment block are hilarious. For relaxing reading you can’t beat Rosamunde Pilcher and for a touch of magic and fairies, Cecilia Ahern. Kate Morton is a wonderful young Australian writer of mysterious historical novels and I enjoy everything by Tracy Chevalier.
                Recently I’ve been reading and reviewing indie writers and my favourites are Terry Tyler who has written a contemporary story based on the Tudor dynasty called Kings and Queens and Carol Hedges, whose Honour and Obey is a mystery set in Victorian London.

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  6. Love your choices – Pippi, Charlotte’s Web and Dr. Seuss are all firm favourites. I was also very fond of all of the Moomins series by Tove Jansson and the by now largely forgotten Adventures of Olga da Polga, the indomitable guinea pig, by Michael Bond (who also created another of my favourites, Paddington Bear).

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  7. I love Dr. Seuss. I have so many fond memories of those books as a child, and of course they were some of the first books I purchased for my son. When he was a baby, his favorite for a long time was Mr. Brown Can Moo Can You? I’m so glad there’s a new one coming out. I’ll be sure to add it to our collection. His genius is in the use of sound which really appeals to all ages. And of course, there is lots of humor.
    My favorite book from childhood is The Children of Noisy Village by Astrid Lindgren. I look forward to reading that to my son. We’ve already read several other Astrid Lindgren books, and he loves the children. Part of the appeal is that they are not always well behaved.

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    • Ula, I’m so with you on Seuss! In fact, back before I was even pregnant (1985), there were book clubs from which you could order the Seuss books. I ordered them and the Disney books, building up my library well before my son was born. Couldn’t imagine Seuss not being part of his young life 🙂

      As for Astrid Lindgren, I hadn’t read any of his books beyond Pippi, so I’m glad you mentioned this one. Will be checking out in the hopes of reading it!

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  8. When I was a kid, Are You My Mother kind of creeped me out. The idea that a baby bird was alone in a big scary world was unsettling. I felt similarly about The Cat In The Hat (a six-foot tall cat breaks into a parentless house and trashes the place). Now that I’m an adult, I have a new-found appreciation for both titles.

    Ferdinand was more my style. I really loved that peaceful, unapologetic nonconformist.

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  9. Pingback: UP!–What’s Worth Celebrating?–CHILDREN’S BOOK WEEK! | Love to read, love to learn!

  10. Each Peach Pear Plum was the first book I read at school and I have fond memories of the Famous Five but there are some books I’m happy I didn’t read as a child as being an adult I think I appreciate them more, I’m sure it works the same the other way and i missed out some wonderful reads when I was younger but books like The Riddles of Epsilon, The Neverending Story and Bruno and Sylvie as well as possibly Peter Pan are so great that I’m glad I read them when I did.

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    • Ste, I know I didn’t read most books as a kid–a morsel in comparison to the kidlit I’ve read as an adult, but am glad to have read them now and still want to read more! And I agree–I’ve found it does work both ways, as I mentioned in a comment somewhere above, about the appreciation–or critical view–as an adult in comparison to reading things as a child.

      I’m looking up some of the books you mentioned here. I’m getting frustrated because I have my limit of library books “on hold” and until I pick some up and many get delivered, I can’t order more! lol Right now they’re all going on my TBR sigh

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  11. At least putting them on a TBR list gives you many things to look forward to, I must say The Riddles of epsilon was really fun, I did a review of it and the highlight for me is the puzzle aspect, there are always four or five mysteries going on and when one is uncovered it creates a couple more so there are always things to work out and discover throughout the book. There are maps in the book as well and I love maps.

    I think it’s great you are so into YA, I think sinking into the genre frequently, keeps the imagination active and keeps us young at heart.

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    • Well, I just requested “Riddles” 😀 We’ll see if I get to read it! It sounds wonderful 🙂 And I’m not so into YA specifically,.but MG thru YA (and not the graphic type) 🙂 My novels will be Upper MG or YA, but I don’t think I’ll make the MCs older than 15 or 16. Still not sure. Will decide once I start writing, I think.

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  12. As a child, my favorite Dr. Seuss book was Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb. It was so rhythmic and I loved all the monkeys 🙂 My son loved hearing A Fish Out of Water and after hearing it repeatedly, could “read” it to us when he was three. My daughter preferred Goodnight Moon to Dr. Seuss. I think I recited that book to her before bed until she was ten!

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    • Hi, Sherrie! Nice to see you here 🙂

      And here I thought I knew ALL the Dr. Seuss books. I don’t! I love hearing about all these with your family, too. So special 😀

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    • I know so many people love those books, Coleen 🙂 You know, I always loved the TV series, but only a couple of years ago I bought THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE BIG WOODS and was enjoying it, but never got through the whole book. I hope I pick it up again 🙂

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